whale Fact or fiction? | Sea Cape Cod by Michael Mosier

Sea Cape Cod by Michael Mosier

Coming soon: Link to Waterfront Photography, in historic downtown Hyannis, Massachusetts, Cape Cod, USA 02651

April 26, 2017

Fact or fiction?

Filed under: Blog — Michael @ 10:32 am

Greetings and salutations from the sand, sun and surf of Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and the foggy, breezy, misting, mysterious, and quite magical island of Nantucket! Quite. ‘Tis wonderful to be with you and yours on this cozy drizzled Wednesday ‘down on the docks’ of ye ole Hyannis Harbor; broadcasting LIVE once again from said bustling docks on this Twenty-Sixth Day of April, 2017.  Two days from now, the sun will be shining once again, with those glorious, gorgeous yellow and white Daffodils adorned on antique cars, out in full force on the cobblestones of that fabled aforementioned isle of Nantucket Saturday morn. This reporter’s first love. If one need more information, please visit ACK.FM.com, download the ‘App’ for a great radio station of the same call letters, airports’ ID propelled; talented DJ Chris Reiser steering one the opening of “Grey Lady”, a new film by John Shea. Awakening the world’s movie goers to a rich, deep, sometimes dark, romantic, fabled whaling history of the most well known island at one time on the face of the ever wide, wonderful, wild world we all share.

AHOY!

As the reality of the malicious (mostly unseen), matrix closes in, on some, one hearkens back to the days when authors like George Orwell (”1984″; circa 1949), and Aldous Huxley (”Brave New World”; circa 1932), were read along the River Thames, discussing the novel with friends at a local pub, before being sucked into the black hole of corporate ‘employment’. While both authors discussed a coming disastrous dystopia, one taking place in the far off year of 2540; the other perhaps a little closer to the ‘time’ period we are experiencing right now, there are some subtle and not so subtle differences.

“You be the judge Greg!”

(credit: “Animal House”, circa 1978)

“What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell, feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell, feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared that the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the ‘feelies’, ‘the orgy porgy’, and the ‘centrifugal bublepuppy’. As Huxley remarked in ‘Brave New World Revisited’, the civil libertarians, and rationalists, who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny, ‘failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions’. In 1984, Huxley, added,‘…people are controlled by inflicting pleasure’. In short, Orwell feared what we hate will ruin us. Huxley feared what we love will ruin us. Perhaps, just perhaps, Huxley was right.” (Neil Postman; “Amusing Ourselves to Death–public disclosure in the age of ‘Show Business’).

Most likely both of these visionaries, seers, were on to the TRUTH. Be careful ‘what’ you love. If if is good, such as “Daffodil Days” on Nantucket, well, you know the rest. In this age of deceit, there is one who holds that truth (hint; he is not in the movies, except for all the predictive programmed movies (where He and his Mother were hijacked for nefarious reasons), that are coming out of Hollywood now, i.e Nicholas Cage’s entire catalogue of cinematic horse hockey).  For darkness can only imitate God, upside down and backwards, deceiving man to follow his wicked ways, until one is gone, lost, doomed.  Look to GOD for answers!  Indeed, may you find him NOW!

Have a spectacular day y’all!

PRESERVE THE WILDERNESS! Peace~M

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